Salisbury: 01722 742066 | Farnborough: 01252 375547
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Neurological Conditions Glenside can support

Glenside has been treating people with traumatic brain injury and anoxic brain injury for over twenty years and can admit individuals with a variety of conditions at different stages of their rehabilitation process.

Our goal is to help our service users maintain the highest quality of life and level of independence possible.

Each individual receives personalised treatment to support their physical, cognitive and behavioural rehabilitation goals. This will include therapy, nursing and medical support.

Care plans are agreed, as far as possible with the individual and / or with their family, friends, advocates or legal representatives.

Care and treatment is planned and delivered in a way that is intended to ensure people’s safety and welfare. Where appropriate and available, Glenside will work with specialist teams and associations to ensure that the service delivered is consistent with best practice in treating that particular condition.

Treatment is individually tailored to meet the needs of each service user and may include physiotherapy, speech and language therapy, occupational therapy, psychiatry, psychology, nursing, assistance with activities of daily living, and a range of vocational / leisure activities all aimed at building independence and supporting individuals to achieve their personal goals.

Neurological conditions Glenside can support, include:

Traumatic Brain Injury

A traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an injury to the brain often linked to a road accident, assault, sporting injury or fall, causing the brain to move violently in the skull.

The primary damage takes place when the brain hits the surface of the skull and the secondary damage can be caused by subsequent bleeding from the initial damage to the brain, leading to pressure building up within the skull.

TBI typically impairs a person’s physical, cognitive and behavioural functioning. Research evidence is clear that early treatment within a specialist rehabilitation service, provides significantly enhanced outcomes and quality of life for the individual, and lower lifetime cost of treatment.

Patients can present with a wide variety of clinical problems, including cognitive, behavioural, physical and neuro-psychiatric deficits and such impairments are amenable to the range of specialist treatment and rehabilitation within Glenside.

Anoxic Brain Injury

Anoxic brain injury can be caused by loss of blood flow to the brain (e.g. in catastrophic haemorrhage or strangulation), or lack of oxygen within the blood flow to the brain (e.g. in asphyxiation or drowning), causing extensive brain cell damage.

Patients can present with a wide variety of clinical problems as seen in most other forms of brain injury, including cognitive, behavioural, physical and neuro-psychiatric deficits and such impairments can benefit from the range of specialist treatment and rehabilitation available within Glenside.

Stroke

A stroke causes a loss of blood supply to the brain. This can be due to a blockage (embolism or thrombosis) or a haemorrhage.

As a result, the affected area of the brain will no longer be able to function as it would have done, affecting movement, speech and cognitive functioning.

Depending on the anatomical site and size of the stroke, patients can present with a wide variety of clinical problems, including physical impairments (mobility speech and swallowing problems), cognitive, behavioural and neuro-psychiatric deficits.

Ideally treatment for a stroke should be provided by health professionals within a specialist unit, such as Glenside, offering a range of therapies to maximize the possibility for the individual to recover some of their lost functions.

Subarachnoid Haemorrhage

A subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), is a form of bleeding within the lining of the brain, which may occur spontaneously, or as a result of a head injury. It is a form of stroke which causes neurological and cognitive impairment of the brain, and sometimes behavioural problems.

Depending on the anatomical site and size of the SAH, patients can present with a variety of clinical problems as seen in most other forms of brain injury, including cognitive, behavioural, physical and neuro-psychiatric deficits and such impairments are amenable to the range of specialist treatment and rehabilitation within Glenside.

Encephalitis

Encephalitis is an inflammation of the brain parenchyma which results in symptoms including seizures, memory problems and executive functioning and in some cases, personality changes.

Treatment in a specialist neuro rehabilitation service such as Glenside, aims to facilitate re-learning of cognitive and behavioural functions caused by the resulting damage to the brain

Brain tumour

A brain tumour is an abnormal growth of cells within the brain or spinal canal. Following an operation to remove the tumour, an individual may experience some loss of functionality impacting on their behavioural, physical or cognitive abilities.

Depending on the anatomical site, and size, of the tumour, patients can present with a wide variety of clinical problems as seen in most other forms of brain injury, including cognitive, behavioural, physical and neuro-psychiatric deficits and such impairments are amenable to the range of specialist treatment and rehabilitation within Glenside.

Meningitis

Meningitis is an acute inflammation of the protective membranes covering the brain and spinal cord, and can be caused by a variety of pathological processes, mainly infections but also auto-immune diseases.

Meningitis can lead to long-term consequences including deafness, epilepsy, as well as general physical and cognitive and neuro-psychiatric deficits. Patients presenting with such impairments can benefit from the range of specialist treatment and rehabilitation within Glenside.

Cerebral / brain abscess

A Brain abscess is an abscess caused by local infection introduced into the brain from infected material from such things as a tooth abscess, or infection of the sinuses, etc.

The infection may also be introduced through a skull fracture following a head trauma or surgical procedure.

Depending on the anatomical site, and size, of the abscess patients can present with a wide variety of clinical problems as seen in most other forms of brain injury, including cognitive, behavioural, physical and neuro-psychiatric deficits and such impairments are amenable to the range of specialist treatment and rehabilitation within Glenside.

Dementia

Dementia is a global loss of cognitive ability as a result of progressive neuro-degeneration, due to damage or disease. It results in loss of memory, attention, speech, problem solving abilities and frequently, personality change.

Dementia can occur before the age of 65, in which case it is termed “early onset dementia”.

In later stages of the condition, people may become disorientated in time (not knowing the day, week or year), in place (not knowing where they are) and in person (not knowing who they are or others that should otherwise have been familiar to them).

Glenside treats individuals with all forms of dementia.

Alzheimer’s disease

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia, most often diagnosed in people aged over 65 years.

Although Alzheimer’s develops differently in different cases. There are many common symptoms including difficulty in remembering recent events and loss of memory. As the disease progresses the individual can become confused, irritable with mood swings and have trouble with language and long term memory loss.

Alzheimer’s can progress undiagnosed for years and develops over a variable amount of time. Eventually leading to progressive decline in physical functioning.

Glenside treats patients with Alzheimer’s and all forms of dementia.

Pick’s disease

Pick’s disease is a relatively rare form of dementia causing progressive destruction of nerve cells, primarily in the frontal lobes of the brain.

Symptoms include loss of memory, as well as marked changes in personality and behaviour with a decline in the ability to speak coherently.

Glenside treats patients with all forms of dementia, including Pick’s disease.

Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease which causes damage to the insulating covers of nerve cells in the brain and spinal cord. This damage affects the ability of parts of the nervous system to communicate normally, resulting in physical, mental and sometimes psychiatric problems. There are several forms of MS with symptoms presenting variably over time.

In advanced stages, the neuro-psychiatric problems may supercede the physical limitations and patients at Glenside can benefit from a full range of relevant therapies to meet their needs, and consistent with best practice and national guidelines according to the MS Society.

Huntington’s disease

Huntington’s disease (HD) is a hereditary degenerative neuro-psychiatric disorder affecting the central nervous system. HD causes involuntary movements and affects coordination, also leading to cognitive decline and mental health issues. Symptoms typically develop when people are aged 30-50 years old, but this can vary.

Glenside works with the Huntington’s disease association to facilitate staff training to fully understand the care needs of individuals with HD. The Association also offers a Helpline service for support and provides a range of publications covering various aspects of HD.

Prion disease

Prion disease, for example Transmissible spongiform encephalopathy (TSE), are a group of progressive conditions that affect the brain and nervous system of many animals, including humans.

The term Prion is derived from the words protein and infections. A prion is an infectious agent composed of protein in a misfolded form. Prions are not living organisms but can reproduce by hijacking the functions of living cells. Once the Prion enters a healthy cell, it causes it to convert into the disease associated prion form which triggers a chain reaction affecting more healthy cells.

There are several variants of Prion diseases in humans.

The human symptoms vary, but commonly include personality changes, psychiatric problems such as depression, memory loss and motor deficits such as lack of coordination and an unsteady gait. In later stages of the disease, patients have severe dementia and lose the ability to move or speak.

Glenside works with the Prion Society to support service users with different variations of Prion disease.

Guillain-Barré syndrome

Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) is an acute disease of the peripheral nervous system in which the arms and legs become inflamed and stop working. Neither hereditary nor contagious, GBS is triggered by an infection that causes sudden weakness in the feet and hands, leading to limb paralysis and a loss of sensation, sometimes with pain. It can also cause complications if either the respiratory muscles or the autonomic nervous system are affected.

With prompt treatment and supportive care, including rehabilitation such as physiotherapy and hydrotherapy, most individuals (80%) make a full recovery.

Glenside works with the GBS support group to link service users and their families with the information and support available.

Motor Neurone diseases

Motor Neurone diseases (MND) are a group of progressive neurological disorders that affect the (neurons) cells that control voluntary muscle activities in the body. Also referred to as Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in the US.

With disruption to signals between the neurons the muscles no longer work properly, leading them to gradually weaken, become stiff, or become overactive in the form of uncontrolled twitching. Over time the ability to control voluntary movement can be lost and muscles will waste away.

At Glenside, the rehabilitation pathway for individuals with Motor Neurone disease includes physiotherapy, including a range of motion and strengthening exercises, to slow muscle weakness. Additional therapy is available for those experiencing difficulties with speech, chewing and swallowing.

Assistive equipment such as braces or supports are available as well as wheelchairs to enable our service users to retain their quality of life and as much independence as possible.

Parkinson’s disease

Parkinson’s disease is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system.

The initial most noticeable symptom of the disease is movement related shaking and difficulty with walking. Later the behaviour and cognitive issues arise with dementia commonly occurring in the advanced stages of the disease, with depression the most common psychiatric symptom. Parkinson’s disease is most common in people aged over 50 years.

Patients at Glenside can benefit from a full range of relevant therapies to meet their needs, and consistent with best practice and national guidelines according to the Parkinson’s Disease Society.

Spinal cord injury

A spinal cord injury (SCI) is damage to the spinal cord that causes changes in its function, either temporarily or permanently. These changes result in a loss of muscle function, sensation, or autonomic function in parts of the body served by the spinal cord below the level of the lesion.

Glenside is able to support individuals with a spinal cord injury towards the end of their acute spinal rehab journey, whilst awaiting a community package or adaptation to their home before discharge.

For further information or to make an enquiry, please call 01722 742066